A trove of Prokofiev material, including 500 scores, 400 books and 500 programs that the composer accumulated during his stay in the West (1918-1938), is now housed at Columbia University’s Butler Rare Book and Manuscript Library. The archive of the composer, whose legacy the Chicago Symphony Orchestra is exploring through its Truth to Power Festivalarrived this spring at Columbia and will reside there for five years and then perhaps permanently.

In a New York Times article published last fall, the composer’s grandson endorsed the move to Columbia, since the university is just a short distance from Carnegie Hall, where his grandfather gave one of his first U.S. performances. “So we can say that Prokofiev has returned to America,” he told the Times, “95 years after his first visit!”

 

 

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